UNDER BUDGET PASSED BY DEMOCRATS, 36TH DISTRICT SCHOOL SYSTEMS WOULD HAVE RECEIVED SIGNIFICANT AID INCREASE

(36th LEGISLATIVE DISTRICT) – Assemblyman Gary S. Schaer on Thursday released a final analysis from the nonpartisan Office of Legislative Services regarding how Gov. Chris Christie’s budgetary line item vetoes will affect residents of the 36th District.
Fourteen out of the 16 school systems in the 36th District will lose funding due to the governor’s cuts, which reduced local school aid for the district by 9.5 percent. Carlstadt, Wood-Ridge, Lyndhurst, Ridgefield and North Arlington were hit hardest.
“I supported a budget which represented the values of the people of the 36th District,” said Schaer, Vice-Chairman of the Assembly Budget Committee. “In many instances, the communities I represent are struggling to fund their public schools in an appropriate manner. Due to the 2 percent cap, which I supported, it is even more critical for Trenton to provide its fair share to our communities so that children can receive the education they deserve.”
The budget passed by the Legislature on June 29th, which Schaer supported, included revenue assumed from imposing a new levy on the 16,000 New Jerseyans that earn $1 million or more per year. The revenue would have only been assessed on dollars earned after the first $1 million and would have raised a projected $613 million. This additional funding was to be allocated to local school districts to help offset property taxes and increase educational services in already cash-strapped school districts.
“By vetoing the Millionaire’s Tax, Governor Christie has indirectly raised taxes on the majority of property taxpaying New Jerseyans while giving a cut to the most wealthy residents of our state,” said Assemblyman Schaer. “In addition to cold-hearted cuts to blind children, college students, seniors and the disabled, I remain disturbed by the moral vacuum with which the Governor sees his stewardship of New Jersey.”
“Short term, children will be hurt by these cuts. Long term, by not investing in our greatest reDest, our people, New Jersey’s ability to economically compete may be stopped in its tracks,” Schaer said.